Split Creek Farm in Anderson, SC — Farm Visit

Split Creek Farm in Anderson, SC — Farm Visit

Welcome to my Tuesday series, Farm Visits. Each post I’ll highlight a local farm, sharing what makes it well worth a visit yourself.

This week we visit Split Creek Farm, a woman-owned grade A goat dairy farm that’s mostly run by women as well. How awesome!

Do you know about how women are changing farming? It’s pretty awesome. Read here and here if you don’t know what I’m talking about. Basically ladies win at making changes in US food.

Owners Jessica Bell and Sandra Coppage. And baby goats.

Owners Jessica Bell and Sandra Coppage. And baby goats.

I find owners Jessica Bell and Sandra Coppage hard at work cleaning and planning in the break between all the rains we’ve been having here in the Upstate. They humor me and pose for a pic with some adorable baby goats.

Sandra takes time to tell me a few basics about the farm and answer any questions before getting back to her heavy workload for the day. I appreciate her for talking briefly because I can tell how busy she is! A working animal farm gives no time for leisure.

I learn that all of Split Creek’s milk and milk products are raw (not pasteurized). They don’t use hormones in their milk production or herbicides and pesticides in their pastures.

Her eyes match. my. shirt!!

Her eyes match. my. shirt!!

I take a goat selfie because—I have to, right?

Sandra also tells me theirs is what’s called an “extended lactation farm”. I’ve never heard much about the lactation habits at dairy farms. Turns out this means Split Creek’s goats stay in milk for 2-3 years—way longer than the standard 10 months.

Many restaurants use Split Creek products, introducing these delicious cheeses to consumers in elevated dishes. The farm gets visitors year-round. But if you can, plan your visit for the spring. Why? Three words: baby goat season. It’s as cute as it sounds.

My wary three-year-old and a confident rooster.

My wary three-year-old and a confident rooster.

This picture of my three-year-old with a rooster and a pig serves as a little heads up about visiting this farm with kids. If you have younger kids like I do, you’ll want to prepare your kids ahead of time for lots of loose animals.

Ellery loves our two cats, and headed straight for a sleeping cat while I was talking to Sandra and Jessica. This barn kitty wasn’t as friendly as our house cats, and there were some tears. Everything turned out fine, but I now know to prepare my two littles ahead of time to look at but not touch the animals. These animals call this farm home, and we’re in their space! It’s a perfect time to talk about who wears the claws in nature.

Goats in the distance

Goats in the distance

I highly suggest scheduling a tour to experience the farm for yourself! You’ll find out everything about the farm and get delicious samples. Or attend the upcoming baby goat celebration, Spring Means Babies. So much fun! I really can’t oversell baby goats.

Goat milk products like ricotta, yogurt, feta and more

Goat milk products like ricotta, yogurt, feta and more

We raid the store before we go. We buy goat milk ricotta, Greek yogurt, feta, plain goat cheese, and fudge. I’m so excited to try all of them! I’ve only had national brand goat cheese from a store before, and I’ve never tried any raw goats milk products before.

Goat Greek yogurt with homemade granola.

Goat Greek yogurt with homemade granola.

This goats milk Greek yogurt has changed my life. I’m usually a person who likes the idea of yogurt but doesn’t actually eat a lot of yogurt. I usually just force feed it to my family with a smile.

I am straight up craving bowls of this goats milk yogurt with my homemade granola. It’s rich, savory, and complicated—all the things I didn’t know were missing from every other yogurt I tried. You haaaave to try it. So so good.

Farm Visit Checklist

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